PREMIERE: Chuck Inglish – Freaknik ‘96

We link up with the ever-evolving LA-based rapper for an interview and the premiere of his new single.

Rapper/producer Chuck Inglish looks to extend his solo catalog this week with the release of his upcoming album, Everybody’s Big Brother, and before dropping off the full project, he’s treated fans to one last single, entitled “Freaknik ‘96.” Equipped with his cracking drums and 90’s-reminiscent strings, the track will instantly transport you back to one of Atlanta’s finest Spring Break parties. We caught up with Inglish to discuss the track and his upcoming album in a brief Q&A, which you can view below. Everybody’s Big Brother will release October 2, and you grab your pre-orders now by clicking here.

With your new single “Freaknik '96” dropping today, give us a little more insight on the inspiration of the track. Its safe to say you weren't in attendance at the Freaknik as a teenager back in 96, right?

No, not in ‘96, but I went with my family to visit my dad's friend in Atlanta on the way down to Disney World in '95. “Freaknik” was a word I kept hearing the whole trip, and I just remember my parents’ friends talking about it. The Radio was talking about it, the Atlanta music scene reflected it. There was a big buzz in the city at that time because the Olympics were taking place the next summer. I wanted to capture that in song form.

As your new track is in ode to nostalgic period in your life, does your upcoming album, Everybody's Big Brother, build upon the same concept throughout?

No.  The album goes through several different sonic moods. In my opinion this might be the only one that gives light to era on the album. I think it's impossible for me not to lean towards that style though. The nostalgia will always inspire me, but this album is a little different.

Even dating back to your days as a member of The Cool Kids, you always maintained a particular throwback sound with your production, which fans have come to love and enjoy by the way, will this album see you taking any different directions?

Yes, a few different directions melted down into one sound. I believe this is the most cohesive record I've made so far. I tried to express the sounds and moods I felt currently. In the past, I have made albums out of collection of songs I created over a small period of time. On this album I knew exactly what was going where, from inception, to completion.

You've titled the album Everybody's Big Brother, what made you decide on that name?

It's what life has molded me as. I've always had to be the “Big Brother,” the one who did it first to make sure it was safe. I will always help, share what I know, and tell you the shit you need to hear in a cooler way. It's just my purpose. I wanted to make an album that meant something to me.

Can we expect a number of your “Little Brothers” to make appearances on the album?

I wouldn't use the term “Little Brothers” haha... but yes. This album was made with the people who I happened to be around while making it. All of the features on this album happened organically, like they were there the day I made it. I wanted it to feel together, so that's why it's such an eclectic cast.

I know you and Mike have announced that The Cool Kids have dismembered, but with you two collaboratively dropping “SuperSquad” a few months ago, we have to ask again if the possibility of a reunion is still on the table.

It's always going to happen. People have to catch it. We are an elusive duo.

Switching directions, we know Detroit is your hometown, but you've previously resided in Chicago and now made the switch and moved out to Los Angeles. How did growing up in The D help shape your musical path, and how has being out in Chi-town and LA helped or hinder its growth?

Detroit gave me the history and the creativity, then developing that creativity in Chicago, being apart of Chicago's renaissance gave me the engine to want to make music all over the planet.   Living LA has helped me alot. Some years have been tougher than others but I came here to develop my real sound and it gave me the playing field I needed to create and solidify my Sounds Like Fun brand.

Speaking on your Sounds Like Fun brand, can you tell us a little more about it?

Sounds like Fun is a company that I started to turn my creations and ideas into a reality. Sounds Like Fun Records is the label. This is my first album under my own label totally.

Now that you’re taking a larger role in the industry, are there any specific people you look at as your “Big Brothers”? How would you say the prepared you for your current role at the helm?

There are a lot of people I would consider friends in the music industry for sure.  But we came up so fast and was successful at it, that I think people thought I knew way more than I did. I got more criticism on what I should've did in hindsight after things I did well, so I didn't get as much advice as would've liked. But that's why I'm determined to make sure I do my part to help always, because you never know who actually needs it.

Everybody's Big Brother is set to release this week, are there any last comments or thoughts you'd like fans to know before its arrival?

I really think the world is going to dig this one. This is the first album I’ve made where I’m really excited for people to hear it, because I know what went into creating it.

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